News

2024

Idea competition by University of Tartu for the reconstruction of academic building in Tallinn for the School of Law

Our entry visually connects the street and courtyard sides of the law institute. The street façade of the study building has large glass surfaces to allow natural light to come inside, creating spaciousness in the classrooms. Inside the building, the atrium extends from the basement to the roof, serving as the backbone of the house.

Triangular volumes frame the façade’s glass surfaces, creating the impression that the academic building has been folded between existing buildings. The result is a symbiosis between contemporary architecture and the buildings of art deco and functionalist style of the early 20th century. We designed a recessed entrance for the building to better connect with the city and the street level.

To create a more user-friendly and accessible space, we lowered the floor of the foyer, which is designed in elegant natural tones. The focal points of the floor plan are the library and a large lecture hall, both sharing similar interior architectural element with the foyer. There are a cosy inner courtyard and an open rooftop to relax between classes and work.

Authors: Margit Aule, Rasmus Ink, Andreas Krigoltoi, Lenne Grettel Leitmaa, Viktoria Ugur (LUMIA).

Põltsamaa Castle received the Grand Prize of Cultural Endowment of Estonia

Põltsamaa Castle has won The Grand Prize in Architecture of the Cultural Endowment of Estonia 2023!

This award is a great recognition which shows that people care about our heritage and the history of Põltsamaa, appreciating the dignified rebirth of the castle through modern architecture.

Two significant buildings of the castle ensemble have been restored through the renovation. The grand convent building and the former gatehouse are now open for visits, exhibiting an insight into the rich history of Põltsamaa.

We celebrate together with our partners who contributed a lot to the project: studio ARGUS, Artes Terrae, Arc Projekt, PULT EXPO, Tarrest LT, Projektibüroo, Haspo, Artur Ümar, and the client – Põltsamaa Vallavara.

Related projects

Põltsamaa Castle received ACHIEVEMENT OF THE YEAR award

The restoration of Põltsamaa Castle received the Achievement of the Year award on November 2nd at the National Heritage Board’s annual awards ceremony.

Dating back to the 13th century, Põltsamaa Castle was originally constructed as a medieval castellum. Later, it served as the residence of Duke Magnus, King of Livonia. In the 18th century, the castle was reborn as a Rococo-style palace. Over time, the magnificent castle ensemble fell into disrepair, but extensive restoration work was completed in the summer of 2023, covering both architectural, interior design and landscaping aspects.

Thanks to the restoration efforts, two significant historical buildings were brought back to life – the convent building and the former gatehouse – and the castle's courtyard was redesigned. The convent building was restored using a conservation approach, and a new steel dome was designed for it. The gatehouse, which was at risk of collapse, has been transformed into a modern visitor centre, where the rich history of Põltsamaa Castle is exhibited.

LUMIA would like to thank their partners for the collaboration on this grand project: studio ARGUS, Artes Terrae, Arc Projekt, PULT, Tarrest LT, Projektibüroo, and Hapso.

Big thanks to the client, Põltsamaa Vallavara!

Related projects

1st place in the competition of Tartu mnt 86b

We are delighted to announce that the proposal by LUMIA and KINO maastikuarhitektid won the architectural competition for the commercial building at Tartu mnt 86b!

Competition by Fausto Capital sought a modern architectural solution for one of the city’s most important junctions. Our work focuses on the innovative and green space, which is dynamically structured, creating an impression of sculptural form. The office building features terraces with spontaneous lush landscaping that appear organic. The setback terraces act as screens, giving the building an attractive and distinctive appearance.

Architecture: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Andreas Krigoltoi, Lenne Grettel Leitmaa, Carl Deion Jõekallas, Ivika Puust, Mari Liis Aader (LUMIA)

Landscape architecture: Juhan Teppart, Elif Naz Duman (KINO maastikuarhitektid)

Estonia's first high-rise building with wooden structures received a construction permit

The first environmentally friendly high-rise building fully constructed with timber in Estonia, designed by LUMIA architects, has got a construction permit. The building is rising in Fahle Park, located in Tartu mnt 84b.

According to architect Margit Aule, there is no other building of such height in Estonia constructed entirely with timber structures, and the design involved collaboration with Tallinn University of Technology and ETH Zürich. “In addition to wooden structures, we also used all other possibilities to reduce building’s carbon footprint”, describes Aule.

The new building’s cross-laminated timber construction has a small ecological footprint, and as a renewable resource, timber is an excellent carbon sink. High fire resistance and thermal insulation ensure energy efficiency and low heating costs. Additionally, the building made of natural materials, provides a much healthier indoor climate for office workers.

The construction of the high-rise will begin later this year.

Patarei Merekindlus

It is not that common to publish books about architectural competitions, which is why we recommend reading a publication titled “Patarei merekindlus. Lihvimisvalmis teemant”.

The book with many illustrations gives an overview of the history of one of Tallinn’s most significant objects – the Patarei Sea Fortress – which was built in 1830s. The main part of the book presents the entries of the architectural contest held in 2020 to renew the Patarei complex.

The project “Elulill” is also featured, which was completed with the participation of architects Margit Aule and Katri Mets from LUMIA. The work got its name from the geometric pattern of the flower of life, which was woven into the roof construction with the help of engineers.

Lootuse 2a - the best building in Tartu

In the competition for the best building of 2022 in Tartu, building at Lootuse street 2a, designed by LUMIA, was chosen as the people’s favourite and the best new building in a valuable milieu. The aim of LUMIA was to design a building that would suit with the unique wooden surroundings in the Karlova district, which is an historical neighbourhood in the city of Tartu from 1916. Karlova is famous for its wooden architecture from the beginning of 20th century.

Therefore, the new commercial building by LUMIA is spatially articulated and the façades are covered with vertical wooden cladding in the colours which are characteristic of the neighbourhood. The ground floor of the building is planned for commercial space which activates the street level and has been nicely embraced by the locals.

The building of Lootuse street 2a forms an ensemble that suits with the surroundings and feels like a modern version of Karlova’s wooden houses.

The title of people’s favourite is a great honour and a sign that the new building pleases the locals an fulfils an important role in the urban space.

Poska 41

Last year, LUMIA finished with the restoration of an historical richly decorated wooden residential building at Poska street in Tallinn. The house is located in Kadriorg, in the old Slobodaa neighbourhood, which developed in the 18th century after the baroque Kadriorg Palace ensemble was built.

In 1888, the residential house designed by Alexey Fedotov was completed for the family of the priest in the Orthodox Church of the Transfiguration of Our Lord. The house was later converted into an apartment building. The street-facing façade of the building is particularly valuable with its decorative woodwork, opening solutions and wrought iron gate, which now are carefully restored and visible.

National Heritage Board awarded LUMIA architects with the recognition of well-restored built monument. Architect Margit Aule writes in the yearbook of heritage protection: “The house at Poska 41 had stood neglected and idle for 30 years in a poor state of repair, to put it mildly. Therefore, it can be said without exaggeration that many may have sympathised with the fate of this beautiful wooden decorated building, but it was the Sikkal family who actually saved it.”

Read more in the yearbook of heritage protection (in Estonian only)

Photos: Martin Siplane

Bright living room of Poska house

Related projects

IMPRESSIVE PIECE OF HERITAGE IN FAHLE PARK TO BE RENOVATED SOON

Completed in the 1920s, Fahle Boiler House is a shining example of Art Nouveau in industrial architecture. This building, once the heart of the complex, still features its valuable massive axed limestone walls, and the slender reinforced concrete columns and girders inside. The boiler towering through three storeys, the railway tracks, walkways and ornate metal railings have stood the test of time.

The magnificent boiler, which will be surrounded by recreation areas, overlooking the city in the higher part, will be exhibited in a dignified manner. Office areas on three levels will be added to the spacious columned hall of the Boiler House. New openings will be cut into the roof and floors to open all areas to natural light.

The interior of the Boiler House will be an airy, well-lighted, unique space with green plants and natural light, distinguished by the historical slender reinforced concrete structures and steel walkways. It will make a perfect home for a business looking for a special, unique space.

Architecture and interior architecture: LUMIA Authors: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Laura Ojala, Karina Krestinov and Kristi Merilo Client: Fausto Capital Partner for furniture and fittings: OCCO

BREEAM Outstanding

We are delighted to announce that the buildings at Tartu maantee 80 and 80D in Fahle Park are now certified as ‘BREEAM Outstanding’. This is the first time when such a recognition has been awarded not only in Estonia but in the Baltic countries.

BREEAM Outstanding is the highest level of a green certificate which is among the best-known in Europe. It is aimed at recognising the environmental sustainability of a building and the well-being of persons working there.

The process of BREEAM certification includes assessment of buildings on the basis of broad-based methodology, taking into consideration nine different categories, which include the well-being of users, energy efficiency, transport, sustainability, diversity of green areas, use of resources, etc.

In our design, we took into consideration the principles of sustainability, and Margit Aule, co-partner in LUMIA, prepared an adaptivity strategy, which was attached to the application. Particularly worth highlighting are the options for regulating the indoor climate of the buildings and the versatile recreation areas, the flexibility of rooms, use of the existing structures and the remarkable green areas, such as the exotically planted glass-roofed gallery passage, which has gained attention because of its landscaping as well as architecture. The buildings are easy to access by public transport or by bike.

Fahle Park is continuing in the green direction, and the construction of a BREEAM-compliant eight-storey timber-structured office building will begin soon.

The building at Poska 41 has been awarded the Recognition of the Estonian National Heritage Board for an ‘Outstandingly restored monument’

The residential building at Poska 41 in Kadriorg, Tallinn, with its beautiful gingerbread trim decoration has won the hearts of many. People have sympathised with the fate of the house, which stood idle and dilapidated for decades. This fairy tale was delivered a happy ending, when the building with character met its new owners, equally special, who made it their home.

The house, completed probably in 1888, was built to be the residence of an Orthodox priest. The construction design was authored by Alexey Fedotov, who designed a number of Russian-style richly decorated gingerbread trim buildings in Tallinn.

The well-accomplished restoration work becomes highlighted in the photos by Martin Siplane. According to the owners, it is not rare to see another group of architecture lovers stop beneath their dining-room window while the tour guide is speaking about the specialness of their home. The expressive beauty of the street-facing façade can now be admired by all passers-by without having to worry about its impending deterioration.

Restaureeritud Poska elamu
Poska elamu tänavafassaadi plastiline puitornamentika.
Street facade of restored Poska house in Kadriorg
Saelõikedetailid Poska elamul

Open House in Fahle park

Open House Tallinn invites those interested to come and learn more about Fahle Park on this Saturday, 15 October.

The history of Fahle area is old and distinguished. Already in the 14th century, a mill was built next to the location of the present-day Fahle Boiler House. The choice of site was quite logical, as this is also the location of the North Estonian Klint and this was where the Härjapea River flowed down the klint in its historical bed. On the other side of the place of the present-day Boiler House, there used to be canals feeding the city of Tallinn with drinking water.

In the early 20th century, buildings of the cellulose factory were constructed in Fahle area to the design of architect Jacques Rosenbaum; 1922 marked the completion of the Boiler House and in 1937 the Chimney was erected.

In 2017, the team of LUMIA, then under the name KAOS Architects, started cooperation with Fausto Capital to recreate the appearance of Fahle estate, which can now, as a result, boast the Headquarters of Postimees newspaper and the renewed historical buildings at Tartu mnt 80 and 82, with net floor area of more than 30,000 m².

The award-winning Fahle Gallery Street was created by LUMIA and studio ARGUS.

LUMIA is also preparing the renovation design for Fahle Boiler House.

Landscape architecture: KINO

Projects of LUMIA in Fahle Park:

Headquarters of Postimees

Tartu mnt 80

Tartu mnt 82

Fahle Gallery

Fahle Boiler House

Tartu mnt 80m

Tartu mnt 84b

LUMIA and PULT win design contest for exhibitions of Tallinn City Museum

In cooperation with the creative agency Pult, we have won the design contest for renewing exhibitions of Tallinn City Museum.

The contest was aimed at finding a design solution to renew the permanent exhibition in the fortifications museum at the Kiek in de Kök tower in Tallinn Old Town and to create an exhibition about the activities of the Brotherhood of Black Heads at Kiek in de Kök and in Tallinn City Life Museum.

Our winning entry chimes with the strong character of the historical space at Kiek in de Kök. For example, the visitor will enter in the midst of a battle scene, as if time was standing still during an attack, the soldiers in armour frozen in combat. The landscape beneath their feet is also descriptive of the situation, being characteristically shaped, muddy and scrambled, which renders the scene even more realistic.

In the floor of the Kiek in de Kök tower, there is an opening not readily explained in the present exhibition. Yet it is a very characteristic and necessary element of a fortification tower: it was used to transport ammunition (cannonballs) to the upper storeys. We are planning to highlight and explain this to the visitors by means of a light installation.

Authors of the design solution: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Celine-Cathy Raaga and Viktoria Ugur (LUMIA); Erika Saks and Maaja Kuiv (Pult)

Renovation works about to begin in Kuressaare Castle

Saaremaa Museum on the western Estonian island of Saaremaa is rich in exhibits as well as buildings. A real gem among them is Kuressaare Episcopal Castle with its outstandingly preserved medieval architecture and interesting collections. The interior of the museum will now undergo renovation works.

LUMIA became the main contractor of the restoration design for Kuressaare Castle as a result of the open design competition. We have completed the restoration design, which will be carried out in phases.

At the end of August, a construction contract was concluded between Saaremaa Museum and Arens Ehitustööd and the renovation works will begin today. The guests will soon be greeted by a substantially more accessible ground floor of the castle with restored rooms and renovated interior. The main three levels of the castle will be interconnected by a new lift. The gateway will get windproof glass floors and a renovated information and ticket-sale area.

The renovated museum plans to reopen in one year.

Client: Saaremaa Museum

Architecture and interior architecture: LUMIA and studio ARGUS

Authors: Margit Aule, Margit Argus, Kristi Merilo and Elo Liina Kaivo

Solis BioDyne’s new green building

Solis BioDyne, a Tartu-based international and swiftly evolving biotech company, has decided to raise a new building that would convey its vision.

The location in the Green Park of Tartu, a rapidly developing production and business area, provides an opportunity for growth and being connected with the city: e.g. following the example of Ülemiste City in Tallinn, a new train stop is being planned so that people arriving in Tartu could go off at the Green Park stop.

The two-storey building accommodates labs as well as offices, lined by an outdoor garden through two floors. The green plant façades, the flowing spatial layout and the spiral staircase all carry a clear message of thinking outside the box.

The team of LUMIA had a superb opportunity to design this environment as a whole: the architecture, the interior architecture and the landscape. Our partner for landscape gardening was Alari Suurmets.

Client: Solis BioDyne (SBD Capital OÜ)

Architecture: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Laura Ojala.

Interior architecture: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Celine-Cathy Raaga.

Structures and engineering design: Projekt O2

From a granary into a cinema and now into a luxurious villa

The historical granary on the property at Suur-Lossi 14 can be seen on a town map of Haapsalu from 1848 and on a lithograph from 1858. The first known conversion project dates back to 1925, when there were plans to turn the former granary into a cinema, called ‘Empire’. Over time, the building was redeveloped on a number of occasions, adding new elements in tune with the times. In 1956 a cinema named ‘Oktoober’ (October) was opened in the building. Later, after privatisation, the building accommodated a nightclub called ‘Club Impulse’.

The granary, the cinema and the nightclub – all the former functions of the building – had no need for windows. Yet the building is situated at a unique location in the Old Town of Haapsalu with views of the evening sun and Väike Viik lake. The new owner, Arjan Van Der Kooij saw the former cinema as a promising private residence, and the architects now had to meet the challenge of how to open the building to sunshine and the views: there is sea on one side and a historical episcopal castle on the other.

We decided to remove the cinema auditorium on the garden side: that side of the building will be glass-only, with terraces opening into the garden. The building has also some interesting stalinist elements, and we have preserved the gable together with the fenestration. The height and slope of the roof have been restored on the basis of the granary building, with some new incised elements aimed at opening the building to the evening sun and the sea.

Architecture and interior architecture: Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Kristi Merilo

Visuals by Yellow Studio – 3D visualizations

LUMIA is creating new interior for Fahle Boiler House with Fausto Capital and Occo

The architects of LUMIA are designing a new life for the last monument to be renovated in Fahle estate: the Boiler House. This building, approximately 6000 m², is a real gem of industrial architecture that could be an ideal home to an ambitious company thinking outside the box.

Fahle Boiler House was initially completed in 1922 but there had been a mill in that place in the 13th century already. Next to the location of the Boiler House on the verge of the North Estonian Klint once ran the River Härjapea, which served as a source of water for the Old Town of Tallinn as well as the Kadriorg area. Traces of water canals are still there under the ground.

The lofty building is single-storeyed and accommodates, in addition to the boiler, a number of technical facilities and passages that give the interior a unique industrial-historical look. We will add new mezzanines, leaving openings in them to allow light and sight to move freely.

Fausto Capital is planning to start the construction this year already. Help with furniture and fittings will be provided by Occo.

Authors of the renovation concept design: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Karina Krestinov, Laura Ojala

Photos: Martin Siplane

LUMIA’s conceptual design for restricted design contest of Triple Net Capital

We were inspired by the views of Lake Harku and forests of Astangu that would open up from the prospective buildings, and offered a white and light cluster of houses, where the exterior of the entire building would be balconied. The extension of residential space to outdoors will provide an additional quality to the compact apartment. The space between the buildings would be green while cars would be hidden underneath the raised landscape around the building.

Authors of the conceptual design: Toomas Adrikorn Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Karina Krestinov, Kristo Põlluaas

LUMIA’s conceptual design for Uusküla spa competition

The sandy beaches on the northern shore of Lake Peipsi are a scenic holiday destination, for which a new spa hotel is being planned. LUMIA’s entry for the design contest proposed a volumetrically structured building, in which the functions have been arranged with due regard to directions of view and light. The spa and the restaurant would be placed towards the evening sun and lake views, and the rooms area would also be structured so as to create better views. The exterior would be covered with patinated copper, which will work in synergy with the green of the pine needles and the brown of the bark.

Historically, this property has accommodated the buildings of a holiday centre that belonged to Sillamäe Chemical Plant.

Authors of the conceptual design: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Karina Krestinov, Katri Mets

LUMIA signs contract with Fausto Capital to design renovation of Fahle Boiler House

Fahle Park, one of the rapidly developing business areas in Tallinn will receive a new landmark, as Fausto Capital and LUMIA have concluded a contract for designing a renovation of the historical Fahle Boiler House. The building still accommodates a lot of interesting technical facilities, such as boilers, bogies, railway sleepers and underground technical tunnels. The high chimney of the Boiler House will be the main attraction after the completion of a new viewing platform at its top.

The ongoing cooperation between Fausto Capital and LUMIA has resulted in more than 30,000 m² of new office space being completed and now in use in Fahle Park. The revival of the area has also been noted by the public: in February, Fahle Gallery was recognised with the Annual Award of the Estonian Cultural Endowment in the category ‘New from old’.

Architecture: LUMIA (Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Karina Krestinov, Laura Ojala)

Fahle Gallery Street wins Annual Award of the Estonian Cultural Endowment

LUMIA, together with KINO landscape architects and studio ARGUS, received the Annual Award 2021 of the Cultural Endowment of Estonia (Architecture Endowment) in the category ‘New from old’ for Fahle Gallery Street. According to the jury, the gallery passage is a well-accomplished symbiosis between new and old, architecture and vegetation planning. The new meeting place in Fahle Park has been noted and recognised.

Fahle galeriitänav roheliste taimede ja uue klaaskatusega

Margit Aule and Toomas Adrikorn establish LUMIA

Six years since the beginning of their cooperation in KAOS Architects, Margit Aule and Toomas Adrikorn have established a new architecture firm, LUMIA.

As a result of division by formation of new companies, KAOS Architects, the company founded in 2010 by Margit Aule and Margit Argus, was wound up and LUMIA launched out in 2022 as one of its successors, equipped with the earlier know-how, the contracts, the portfolio and the employees.

LUMIA has extensive experience of creating modern contextual architecture, and its portfolio contains a number of award-winning projects, including the Pilgrims’ House in Vastseliina and the building of Estonian Embassy in Moscow.

The meanings of the name LUMIA are open to interpretation, reflecting a shared vision and common values. The works of LUMIA will be centred on sensitive integration of the existing with the new to form a whole.

The integrative spaces are being created by a team of 12 specialists: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Karina Krestinov, Moonika Liias, Kristi Merilo, Katri Mets, Laura Ojala, Kristo Põlluaas, Celine-Cathy Raaga, Laura Susi, Viivika Tiirik, Katrin Vilba.

2023

Idea competition by University of Tartu for the reconstruction of academic building in Tallinn for the School of Law

Our entry visually connects the street and courtyard sides of the law institute. The street façade of the study building has large glass surfaces to allow natural light to come inside, creating spaciousness in the classrooms. Inside the building, the atrium extends from the basement to the roof, serving as the backbone of the house.

Triangular volumes frame the façade’s glass surfaces, creating the impression that the academic building has been folded between existing buildings. The result is a symbiosis between contemporary architecture and the buildings of art deco and functionalist style of the early 20th century. We designed a recessed entrance for the building to better connect with the city and the street level.

To create a more user-friendly and accessible space, we lowered the floor of the foyer, which is designed in elegant natural tones. The focal points of the floor plan are the library and a large lecture hall, both sharing similar interior architectural element with the foyer. There are a cosy inner courtyard and an open rooftop to relax between classes and work.

Authors: Margit Aule, Rasmus Ink, Andreas Krigoltoi, Lenne Grettel Leitmaa, Viktoria Ugur (LUMIA).

Põltsamaa Castle received the Grand Prize of Cultural Endowment of Estonia

Põltsamaa Castle has won The Grand Prize in Architecture of the Cultural Endowment of Estonia 2023!

This award is a great recognition which shows that people care about our heritage and the history of Põltsamaa, appreciating the dignified rebirth of the castle through modern architecture.

Two significant buildings of the castle ensemble have been restored through the renovation. The grand convent building and the former gatehouse are now open for visits, exhibiting an insight into the rich history of Põltsamaa.

We celebrate together with our partners who contributed a lot to the project: studio ARGUS, Artes Terrae, Arc Projekt, PULT EXPO, Tarrest LT, Projektibüroo, Haspo, Artur Ümar, and the client – Põltsamaa Vallavara.

Related projects

Põltsamaa Castle received ACHIEVEMENT OF THE YEAR award

The restoration of Põltsamaa Castle received the Achievement of the Year award on November 2nd at the National Heritage Board’s annual awards ceremony.

Dating back to the 13th century, Põltsamaa Castle was originally constructed as a medieval castellum. Later, it served as the residence of Duke Magnus, King of Livonia. In the 18th century, the castle was reborn as a Rococo-style palace. Over time, the magnificent castle ensemble fell into disrepair, but extensive restoration work was completed in the summer of 2023, covering both architectural, interior design and landscaping aspects.

Thanks to the restoration efforts, two significant historical buildings were brought back to life – the convent building and the former gatehouse – and the castle's courtyard was redesigned. The convent building was restored using a conservation approach, and a new steel dome was designed for it. The gatehouse, which was at risk of collapse, has been transformed into a modern visitor centre, where the rich history of Põltsamaa Castle is exhibited.

LUMIA would like to thank their partners for the collaboration on this grand project: studio ARGUS, Artes Terrae, Arc Projekt, PULT, Tarrest LT, Projektibüroo, and Hapso.

Big thanks to the client, Põltsamaa Vallavara!

Related projects

1st place in the competition of Tartu mnt 86b

We are delighted to announce that the proposal by LUMIA and KINO maastikuarhitektid won the architectural competition for the commercial building at Tartu mnt 86b!

Competition by Fausto Capital sought a modern architectural solution for one of the city’s most important junctions. Our work focuses on the innovative and green space, which is dynamically structured, creating an impression of sculptural form. The office building features terraces with spontaneous lush landscaping that appear organic. The setback terraces act as screens, giving the building an attractive and distinctive appearance.

Architecture: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Andreas Krigoltoi, Lenne Grettel Leitmaa, Carl Deion Jõekallas, Ivika Puust, Mari Liis Aader (LUMIA)

Landscape architecture: Juhan Teppart, Elif Naz Duman (KINO maastikuarhitektid)

Estonia's first high-rise building with wooden structures received a construction permit

The first environmentally friendly high-rise building fully constructed with timber in Estonia, designed by LUMIA architects, has got a construction permit. The building is rising in Fahle Park, located in Tartu mnt 84b.

According to architect Margit Aule, there is no other building of such height in Estonia constructed entirely with timber structures, and the design involved collaboration with Tallinn University of Technology and ETH Zürich. “In addition to wooden structures, we also used all other possibilities to reduce building’s carbon footprint”, describes Aule.

The new building’s cross-laminated timber construction has a small ecological footprint, and as a renewable resource, timber is an excellent carbon sink. High fire resistance and thermal insulation ensure energy efficiency and low heating costs. Additionally, the building made of natural materials, provides a much healthier indoor climate for office workers.

The construction of the high-rise will begin later this year.

Patarei Merekindlus

It is not that common to publish books about architectural competitions, which is why we recommend reading a publication titled “Patarei merekindlus. Lihvimisvalmis teemant”.

The book with many illustrations gives an overview of the history of one of Tallinn’s most significant objects – the Patarei Sea Fortress – which was built in 1830s. The main part of the book presents the entries of the architectural contest held in 2020 to renew the Patarei complex.

The project “Elulill” is also featured, which was completed with the participation of architects Margit Aule and Katri Mets from LUMIA. The work got its name from the geometric pattern of the flower of life, which was woven into the roof construction with the help of engineers.

Lootuse 2a - the best building in Tartu

In the competition for the best building of 2022 in Tartu, building at Lootuse street 2a, designed by LUMIA, was chosen as the people’s favourite and the best new building in a valuable milieu. The aim of LUMIA was to design a building that would suit with the unique wooden surroundings in the Karlova district, which is an historical neighbourhood in the city of Tartu from 1916. Karlova is famous for its wooden architecture from the beginning of 20th century.

Therefore, the new commercial building by LUMIA is spatially articulated and the façades are covered with vertical wooden cladding in the colours which are characteristic of the neighbourhood. The ground floor of the building is planned for commercial space which activates the street level and has been nicely embraced by the locals.

The building of Lootuse street 2a forms an ensemble that suits with the surroundings and feels like a modern version of Karlova’s wooden houses.

The title of people’s favourite is a great honour and a sign that the new building pleases the locals an fulfils an important role in the urban space.

Poska 41

Last year, LUMIA finished with the restoration of an historical richly decorated wooden residential building at Poska street in Tallinn. The house is located in Kadriorg, in the old Slobodaa neighbourhood, which developed in the 18th century after the baroque Kadriorg Palace ensemble was built.

In 1888, the residential house designed by Alexey Fedotov was completed for the family of the priest in the Orthodox Church of the Transfiguration of Our Lord. The house was later converted into an apartment building. The street-facing façade of the building is particularly valuable with its decorative woodwork, opening solutions and wrought iron gate, which now are carefully restored and visible.

National Heritage Board awarded LUMIA architects with the recognition of well-restored built monument. Architect Margit Aule writes in the yearbook of heritage protection: “The house at Poska 41 had stood neglected and idle for 30 years in a poor state of repair, to put it mildly. Therefore, it can be said without exaggeration that many may have sympathised with the fate of this beautiful wooden decorated building, but it was the Sikkal family who actually saved it.”

Read more in the yearbook of heritage protection (in Estonian only)

Photos: Martin Siplane

Bright living room of Poska house

Related projects

IMPRESSIVE PIECE OF HERITAGE IN FAHLE PARK TO BE RENOVATED SOON

Completed in the 1920s, Fahle Boiler House is a shining example of Art Nouveau in industrial architecture. This building, once the heart of the complex, still features its valuable massive axed limestone walls, and the slender reinforced concrete columns and girders inside. The boiler towering through three storeys, the railway tracks, walkways and ornate metal railings have stood the test of time.

The magnificent boiler, which will be surrounded by recreation areas, overlooking the city in the higher part, will be exhibited in a dignified manner. Office areas on three levels will be added to the spacious columned hall of the Boiler House. New openings will be cut into the roof and floors to open all areas to natural light.

The interior of the Boiler House will be an airy, well-lighted, unique space with green plants and natural light, distinguished by the historical slender reinforced concrete structures and steel walkways. It will make a perfect home for a business looking for a special, unique space.

Architecture and interior architecture: LUMIA Authors: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Laura Ojala, Karina Krestinov and Kristi Merilo Client: Fausto Capital Partner for furniture and fittings: OCCO

BREEAM Outstanding

We are delighted to announce that the buildings at Tartu maantee 80 and 80D in Fahle Park are now certified as ‘BREEAM Outstanding’. This is the first time when such a recognition has been awarded not only in Estonia but in the Baltic countries.

BREEAM Outstanding is the highest level of a green certificate which is among the best-known in Europe. It is aimed at recognising the environmental sustainability of a building and the well-being of persons working there.

The process of BREEAM certification includes assessment of buildings on the basis of broad-based methodology, taking into consideration nine different categories, which include the well-being of users, energy efficiency, transport, sustainability, diversity of green areas, use of resources, etc.

In our design, we took into consideration the principles of sustainability, and Margit Aule, co-partner in LUMIA, prepared an adaptivity strategy, which was attached to the application. Particularly worth highlighting are the options for regulating the indoor climate of the buildings and the versatile recreation areas, the flexibility of rooms, use of the existing structures and the remarkable green areas, such as the exotically planted glass-roofed gallery passage, which has gained attention because of its landscaping as well as architecture. The buildings are easy to access by public transport or by bike.

Fahle Park is continuing in the green direction, and the construction of a BREEAM-compliant eight-storey timber-structured office building will begin soon.

The building at Poska 41 has been awarded the Recognition of the Estonian National Heritage Board for an ‘Outstandingly restored monument’

The residential building at Poska 41 in Kadriorg, Tallinn, with its beautiful gingerbread trim decoration has won the hearts of many. People have sympathised with the fate of the house, which stood idle and dilapidated for decades. This fairy tale was delivered a happy ending, when the building with character met its new owners, equally special, who made it their home.

The house, completed probably in 1888, was built to be the residence of an Orthodox priest. The construction design was authored by Alexey Fedotov, who designed a number of Russian-style richly decorated gingerbread trim buildings in Tallinn.

The well-accomplished restoration work becomes highlighted in the photos by Martin Siplane. According to the owners, it is not rare to see another group of architecture lovers stop beneath their dining-room window while the tour guide is speaking about the specialness of their home. The expressive beauty of the street-facing façade can now be admired by all passers-by without having to worry about its impending deterioration.

Restaureeritud Poska elamu
Poska elamu tänavafassaadi plastiline puitornamentika.
Street facade of restored Poska house in Kadriorg
Saelõikedetailid Poska elamul

Open House in Fahle park

Open House Tallinn invites those interested to come and learn more about Fahle Park on this Saturday, 15 October.

The history of Fahle area is old and distinguished. Already in the 14th century, a mill was built next to the location of the present-day Fahle Boiler House. The choice of site was quite logical, as this is also the location of the North Estonian Klint and this was where the Härjapea River flowed down the klint in its historical bed. On the other side of the place of the present-day Boiler House, there used to be canals feeding the city of Tallinn with drinking water.

In the early 20th century, buildings of the cellulose factory were constructed in Fahle area to the design of architect Jacques Rosenbaum; 1922 marked the completion of the Boiler House and in 1937 the Chimney was erected.

In 2017, the team of LUMIA, then under the name KAOS Architects, started cooperation with Fausto Capital to recreate the appearance of Fahle estate, which can now, as a result, boast the Headquarters of Postimees newspaper and the renewed historical buildings at Tartu mnt 80 and 82, with net floor area of more than 30,000 m².

The award-winning Fahle Gallery Street was created by LUMIA and studio ARGUS.

LUMIA is also preparing the renovation design for Fahle Boiler House.

Landscape architecture: KINO

Projects of LUMIA in Fahle Park:

Headquarters of Postimees

Tartu mnt 80

Tartu mnt 82

Fahle Gallery

Fahle Boiler House

Tartu mnt 80m

Tartu mnt 84b

LUMIA and PULT win design contest for exhibitions of Tallinn City Museum

In cooperation with the creative agency Pult, we have won the design contest for renewing exhibitions of Tallinn City Museum.

The contest was aimed at finding a design solution to renew the permanent exhibition in the fortifications museum at the Kiek in de Kök tower in Tallinn Old Town and to create an exhibition about the activities of the Brotherhood of Black Heads at Kiek in de Kök and in Tallinn City Life Museum.

Our winning entry chimes with the strong character of the historical space at Kiek in de Kök. For example, the visitor will enter in the midst of a battle scene, as if time was standing still during an attack, the soldiers in armour frozen in combat. The landscape beneath their feet is also descriptive of the situation, being characteristically shaped, muddy and scrambled, which renders the scene even more realistic.

In the floor of the Kiek in de Kök tower, there is an opening not readily explained in the present exhibition. Yet it is a very characteristic and necessary element of a fortification tower: it was used to transport ammunition (cannonballs) to the upper storeys. We are planning to highlight and explain this to the visitors by means of a light installation.

Authors of the design solution: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Celine-Cathy Raaga and Viktoria Ugur (LUMIA); Erika Saks and Maaja Kuiv (Pult)

Renovation works about to begin in Kuressaare Castle

Saaremaa Museum on the western Estonian island of Saaremaa is rich in exhibits as well as buildings. A real gem among them is Kuressaare Episcopal Castle with its outstandingly preserved medieval architecture and interesting collections. The interior of the museum will now undergo renovation works.

LUMIA became the main contractor of the restoration design for Kuressaare Castle as a result of the open design competition. We have completed the restoration design, which will be carried out in phases.

At the end of August, a construction contract was concluded between Saaremaa Museum and Arens Ehitustööd and the renovation works will begin today. The guests will soon be greeted by a substantially more accessible ground floor of the castle with restored rooms and renovated interior. The main three levels of the castle will be interconnected by a new lift. The gateway will get windproof glass floors and a renovated information and ticket-sale area.

The renovated museum plans to reopen in one year.

Client: Saaremaa Museum

Architecture and interior architecture: LUMIA and studio ARGUS

Authors: Margit Aule, Margit Argus, Kristi Merilo and Elo Liina Kaivo

Solis BioDyne’s new green building

Solis BioDyne, a Tartu-based international and swiftly evolving biotech company, has decided to raise a new building that would convey its vision.

The location in the Green Park of Tartu, a rapidly developing production and business area, provides an opportunity for growth and being connected with the city: e.g. following the example of Ülemiste City in Tallinn, a new train stop is being planned so that people arriving in Tartu could go off at the Green Park stop.

The two-storey building accommodates labs as well as offices, lined by an outdoor garden through two floors. The green plant façades, the flowing spatial layout and the spiral staircase all carry a clear message of thinking outside the box.

The team of LUMIA had a superb opportunity to design this environment as a whole: the architecture, the interior architecture and the landscape. Our partner for landscape gardening was Alari Suurmets.

Client: Solis BioDyne (SBD Capital OÜ)

Architecture: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Laura Ojala.

Interior architecture: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Celine-Cathy Raaga.

Structures and engineering design: Projekt O2

From a granary into a cinema and now into a luxurious villa

The historical granary on the property at Suur-Lossi 14 can be seen on a town map of Haapsalu from 1848 and on a lithograph from 1858. The first known conversion project dates back to 1925, when there were plans to turn the former granary into a cinema, called ‘Empire’. Over time, the building was redeveloped on a number of occasions, adding new elements in tune with the times. In 1956 a cinema named ‘Oktoober’ (October) was opened in the building. Later, after privatisation, the building accommodated a nightclub called ‘Club Impulse’.

The granary, the cinema and the nightclub – all the former functions of the building – had no need for windows. Yet the building is situated at a unique location in the Old Town of Haapsalu with views of the evening sun and Väike Viik lake. The new owner, Arjan Van Der Kooij saw the former cinema as a promising private residence, and the architects now had to meet the challenge of how to open the building to sunshine and the views: there is sea on one side and a historical episcopal castle on the other.

We decided to remove the cinema auditorium on the garden side: that side of the building will be glass-only, with terraces opening into the garden. The building has also some interesting stalinist elements, and we have preserved the gable together with the fenestration. The height and slope of the roof have been restored on the basis of the granary building, with some new incised elements aimed at opening the building to the evening sun and the sea.

Architecture and interior architecture: Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Kristi Merilo

Visuals by Yellow Studio – 3D visualizations

LUMIA is creating new interior for Fahle Boiler House with Fausto Capital and Occo

The architects of LUMIA are designing a new life for the last monument to be renovated in Fahle estate: the Boiler House. This building, approximately 6000 m², is a real gem of industrial architecture that could be an ideal home to an ambitious company thinking outside the box.

Fahle Boiler House was initially completed in 1922 but there had been a mill in that place in the 13th century already. Next to the location of the Boiler House on the verge of the North Estonian Klint once ran the River Härjapea, which served as a source of water for the Old Town of Tallinn as well as the Kadriorg area. Traces of water canals are still there under the ground.

The lofty building is single-storeyed and accommodates, in addition to the boiler, a number of technical facilities and passages that give the interior a unique industrial-historical look. We will add new mezzanines, leaving openings in them to allow light and sight to move freely.

Fausto Capital is planning to start the construction this year already. Help with furniture and fittings will be provided by Occo.

Authors of the renovation concept design: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Karina Krestinov, Laura Ojala

Photos: Martin Siplane

LUMIA’s conceptual design for restricted design contest of Triple Net Capital

We were inspired by the views of Lake Harku and forests of Astangu that would open up from the prospective buildings, and offered a white and light cluster of houses, where the exterior of the entire building would be balconied. The extension of residential space to outdoors will provide an additional quality to the compact apartment. The space between the buildings would be green while cars would be hidden underneath the raised landscape around the building.

Authors of the conceptual design: Toomas Adrikorn Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Karina Krestinov, Kristo Põlluaas

LUMIA’s conceptual design for Uusküla spa competition

The sandy beaches on the northern shore of Lake Peipsi are a scenic holiday destination, for which a new spa hotel is being planned. LUMIA’s entry for the design contest proposed a volumetrically structured building, in which the functions have been arranged with due regard to directions of view and light. The spa and the restaurant would be placed towards the evening sun and lake views, and the rooms area would also be structured so as to create better views. The exterior would be covered with patinated copper, which will work in synergy with the green of the pine needles and the brown of the bark.

Historically, this property has accommodated the buildings of a holiday centre that belonged to Sillamäe Chemical Plant.

Authors of the conceptual design: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Karina Krestinov, Katri Mets

LUMIA signs contract with Fausto Capital to design renovation of Fahle Boiler House

Fahle Park, one of the rapidly developing business areas in Tallinn will receive a new landmark, as Fausto Capital and LUMIA have concluded a contract for designing a renovation of the historical Fahle Boiler House. The building still accommodates a lot of interesting technical facilities, such as boilers, bogies, railway sleepers and underground technical tunnels. The high chimney of the Boiler House will be the main attraction after the completion of a new viewing platform at its top.

The ongoing cooperation between Fausto Capital and LUMIA has resulted in more than 30,000 m² of new office space being completed and now in use in Fahle Park. The revival of the area has also been noted by the public: in February, Fahle Gallery was recognised with the Annual Award of the Estonian Cultural Endowment in the category ‘New from old’.

Architecture: LUMIA (Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Karina Krestinov, Laura Ojala)

Fahle Gallery Street wins Annual Award of the Estonian Cultural Endowment

LUMIA, together with KINO landscape architects and studio ARGUS, received the Annual Award 2021 of the Cultural Endowment of Estonia (Architecture Endowment) in the category ‘New from old’ for Fahle Gallery Street. According to the jury, the gallery passage is a well-accomplished symbiosis between new and old, architecture and vegetation planning. The new meeting place in Fahle Park has been noted and recognised.

Fahle galeriitänav roheliste taimede ja uue klaaskatusega

Margit Aule and Toomas Adrikorn establish LUMIA

Six years since the beginning of their cooperation in KAOS Architects, Margit Aule and Toomas Adrikorn have established a new architecture firm, LUMIA.

As a result of division by formation of new companies, KAOS Architects, the company founded in 2010 by Margit Aule and Margit Argus, was wound up and LUMIA launched out in 2022 as one of its successors, equipped with the earlier know-how, the contracts, the portfolio and the employees.

LUMIA has extensive experience of creating modern contextual architecture, and its portfolio contains a number of award-winning projects, including the Pilgrims’ House in Vastseliina and the building of Estonian Embassy in Moscow.

The meanings of the name LUMIA are open to interpretation, reflecting a shared vision and common values. The works of LUMIA will be centred on sensitive integration of the existing with the new to form a whole.

The integrative spaces are being created by a team of 12 specialists: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Karina Krestinov, Moonika Liias, Kristi Merilo, Katri Mets, Laura Ojala, Kristo Põlluaas, Celine-Cathy Raaga, Laura Susi, Viivika Tiirik, Katrin Vilba.

2022

Idea competition by University of Tartu for the reconstruction of academic building in Tallinn for the School of Law

Our entry visually connects the street and courtyard sides of the law institute. The street façade of the study building has large glass surfaces to allow natural light to come inside, creating spaciousness in the classrooms. Inside the building, the atrium extends from the basement to the roof, serving as the backbone of the house.

Triangular volumes frame the façade’s glass surfaces, creating the impression that the academic building has been folded between existing buildings. The result is a symbiosis between contemporary architecture and the buildings of art deco and functionalist style of the early 20th century. We designed a recessed entrance for the building to better connect with the city and the street level.

To create a more user-friendly and accessible space, we lowered the floor of the foyer, which is designed in elegant natural tones. The focal points of the floor plan are the library and a large lecture hall, both sharing similar interior architectural element with the foyer. There are a cosy inner courtyard and an open rooftop to relax between classes and work.

Authors: Margit Aule, Rasmus Ink, Andreas Krigoltoi, Lenne Grettel Leitmaa, Viktoria Ugur (LUMIA).

Põltsamaa Castle received the Grand Prize of Cultural Endowment of Estonia

Põltsamaa Castle has won The Grand Prize in Architecture of the Cultural Endowment of Estonia 2023!

This award is a great recognition which shows that people care about our heritage and the history of Põltsamaa, appreciating the dignified rebirth of the castle through modern architecture.

Two significant buildings of the castle ensemble have been restored through the renovation. The grand convent building and the former gatehouse are now open for visits, exhibiting an insight into the rich history of Põltsamaa.

We celebrate together with our partners who contributed a lot to the project: studio ARGUS, Artes Terrae, Arc Projekt, PULT EXPO, Tarrest LT, Projektibüroo, Haspo, Artur Ümar, and the client – Põltsamaa Vallavara.

Related projects

Põltsamaa Castle received ACHIEVEMENT OF THE YEAR award

The restoration of Põltsamaa Castle received the Achievement of the Year award on November 2nd at the National Heritage Board’s annual awards ceremony.

Dating back to the 13th century, Põltsamaa Castle was originally constructed as a medieval castellum. Later, it served as the residence of Duke Magnus, King of Livonia. In the 18th century, the castle was reborn as a Rococo-style palace. Over time, the magnificent castle ensemble fell into disrepair, but extensive restoration work was completed in the summer of 2023, covering both architectural, interior design and landscaping aspects.

Thanks to the restoration efforts, two significant historical buildings were brought back to life – the convent building and the former gatehouse – and the castle's courtyard was redesigned. The convent building was restored using a conservation approach, and a new steel dome was designed for it. The gatehouse, which was at risk of collapse, has been transformed into a modern visitor centre, where the rich history of Põltsamaa Castle is exhibited.

LUMIA would like to thank their partners for the collaboration on this grand project: studio ARGUS, Artes Terrae, Arc Projekt, PULT, Tarrest LT, Projektibüroo, and Hapso.

Big thanks to the client, Põltsamaa Vallavara!

Related projects

1st place in the competition of Tartu mnt 86b

We are delighted to announce that the proposal by LUMIA and KINO maastikuarhitektid won the architectural competition for the commercial building at Tartu mnt 86b!

Competition by Fausto Capital sought a modern architectural solution for one of the city’s most important junctions. Our work focuses on the innovative and green space, which is dynamically structured, creating an impression of sculptural form. The office building features terraces with spontaneous lush landscaping that appear organic. The setback terraces act as screens, giving the building an attractive and distinctive appearance.

Architecture: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Andreas Krigoltoi, Lenne Grettel Leitmaa, Carl Deion Jõekallas, Ivika Puust, Mari Liis Aader (LUMIA)

Landscape architecture: Juhan Teppart, Elif Naz Duman (KINO maastikuarhitektid)

Estonia's first high-rise building with wooden structures received a construction permit

The first environmentally friendly high-rise building fully constructed with timber in Estonia, designed by LUMIA architects, has got a construction permit. The building is rising in Fahle Park, located in Tartu mnt 84b.

According to architect Margit Aule, there is no other building of such height in Estonia constructed entirely with timber structures, and the design involved collaboration with Tallinn University of Technology and ETH Zürich. “In addition to wooden structures, we also used all other possibilities to reduce building’s carbon footprint”, describes Aule.

The new building’s cross-laminated timber construction has a small ecological footprint, and as a renewable resource, timber is an excellent carbon sink. High fire resistance and thermal insulation ensure energy efficiency and low heating costs. Additionally, the building made of natural materials, provides a much healthier indoor climate for office workers.

The construction of the high-rise will begin later this year.

Patarei Merekindlus

It is not that common to publish books about architectural competitions, which is why we recommend reading a publication titled “Patarei merekindlus. Lihvimisvalmis teemant”.

The book with many illustrations gives an overview of the history of one of Tallinn’s most significant objects – the Patarei Sea Fortress – which was built in 1830s. The main part of the book presents the entries of the architectural contest held in 2020 to renew the Patarei complex.

The project “Elulill” is also featured, which was completed with the participation of architects Margit Aule and Katri Mets from LUMIA. The work got its name from the geometric pattern of the flower of life, which was woven into the roof construction with the help of engineers.

Lootuse 2a - the best building in Tartu

In the competition for the best building of 2022 in Tartu, building at Lootuse street 2a, designed by LUMIA, was chosen as the people’s favourite and the best new building in a valuable milieu. The aim of LUMIA was to design a building that would suit with the unique wooden surroundings in the Karlova district, which is an historical neighbourhood in the city of Tartu from 1916. Karlova is famous for its wooden architecture from the beginning of 20th century.

Therefore, the new commercial building by LUMIA is spatially articulated and the façades are covered with vertical wooden cladding in the colours which are characteristic of the neighbourhood. The ground floor of the building is planned for commercial space which activates the street level and has been nicely embraced by the locals.

The building of Lootuse street 2a forms an ensemble that suits with the surroundings and feels like a modern version of Karlova’s wooden houses.

The title of people’s favourite is a great honour and a sign that the new building pleases the locals an fulfils an important role in the urban space.

Poska 41

Last year, LUMIA finished with the restoration of an historical richly decorated wooden residential building at Poska street in Tallinn. The house is located in Kadriorg, in the old Slobodaa neighbourhood, which developed in the 18th century after the baroque Kadriorg Palace ensemble was built.

In 1888, the residential house designed by Alexey Fedotov was completed for the family of the priest in the Orthodox Church of the Transfiguration of Our Lord. The house was later converted into an apartment building. The street-facing façade of the building is particularly valuable with its decorative woodwork, opening solutions and wrought iron gate, which now are carefully restored and visible.

National Heritage Board awarded LUMIA architects with the recognition of well-restored built monument. Architect Margit Aule writes in the yearbook of heritage protection: “The house at Poska 41 had stood neglected and idle for 30 years in a poor state of repair, to put it mildly. Therefore, it can be said without exaggeration that many may have sympathised with the fate of this beautiful wooden decorated building, but it was the Sikkal family who actually saved it.”

Read more in the yearbook of heritage protection (in Estonian only)

Photos: Martin Siplane

Bright living room of Poska house

Related projects

IMPRESSIVE PIECE OF HERITAGE IN FAHLE PARK TO BE RENOVATED SOON

Completed in the 1920s, Fahle Boiler House is a shining example of Art Nouveau in industrial architecture. This building, once the heart of the complex, still features its valuable massive axed limestone walls, and the slender reinforced concrete columns and girders inside. The boiler towering through three storeys, the railway tracks, walkways and ornate metal railings have stood the test of time.

The magnificent boiler, which will be surrounded by recreation areas, overlooking the city in the higher part, will be exhibited in a dignified manner. Office areas on three levels will be added to the spacious columned hall of the Boiler House. New openings will be cut into the roof and floors to open all areas to natural light.

The interior of the Boiler House will be an airy, well-lighted, unique space with green plants and natural light, distinguished by the historical slender reinforced concrete structures and steel walkways. It will make a perfect home for a business looking for a special, unique space.

Architecture and interior architecture: LUMIA Authors: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Laura Ojala, Karina Krestinov and Kristi Merilo Client: Fausto Capital Partner for furniture and fittings: OCCO

BREEAM Outstanding

We are delighted to announce that the buildings at Tartu maantee 80 and 80D in Fahle Park are now certified as ‘BREEAM Outstanding’. This is the first time when such a recognition has been awarded not only in Estonia but in the Baltic countries.

BREEAM Outstanding is the highest level of a green certificate which is among the best-known in Europe. It is aimed at recognising the environmental sustainability of a building and the well-being of persons working there.

The process of BREEAM certification includes assessment of buildings on the basis of broad-based methodology, taking into consideration nine different categories, which include the well-being of users, energy efficiency, transport, sustainability, diversity of green areas, use of resources, etc.

In our design, we took into consideration the principles of sustainability, and Margit Aule, co-partner in LUMIA, prepared an adaptivity strategy, which was attached to the application. Particularly worth highlighting are the options for regulating the indoor climate of the buildings and the versatile recreation areas, the flexibility of rooms, use of the existing structures and the remarkable green areas, such as the exotically planted glass-roofed gallery passage, which has gained attention because of its landscaping as well as architecture. The buildings are easy to access by public transport or by bike.

Fahle Park is continuing in the green direction, and the construction of a BREEAM-compliant eight-storey timber-structured office building will begin soon.

The building at Poska 41 has been awarded the Recognition of the Estonian National Heritage Board for an ‘Outstandingly restored monument’

The residential building at Poska 41 in Kadriorg, Tallinn, with its beautiful gingerbread trim decoration has won the hearts of many. People have sympathised with the fate of the house, which stood idle and dilapidated for decades. This fairy tale was delivered a happy ending, when the building with character met its new owners, equally special, who made it their home.

The house, completed probably in 1888, was built to be the residence of an Orthodox priest. The construction design was authored by Alexey Fedotov, who designed a number of Russian-style richly decorated gingerbread trim buildings in Tallinn.

The well-accomplished restoration work becomes highlighted in the photos by Martin Siplane. According to the owners, it is not rare to see another group of architecture lovers stop beneath their dining-room window while the tour guide is speaking about the specialness of their home. The expressive beauty of the street-facing façade can now be admired by all passers-by without having to worry about its impending deterioration.

Restaureeritud Poska elamu
Poska elamu tänavafassaadi plastiline puitornamentika.
Street facade of restored Poska house in Kadriorg
Saelõikedetailid Poska elamul

Open House in Fahle park

Open House Tallinn invites those interested to come and learn more about Fahle Park on this Saturday, 15 October.

The history of Fahle area is old and distinguished. Already in the 14th century, a mill was built next to the location of the present-day Fahle Boiler House. The choice of site was quite logical, as this is also the location of the North Estonian Klint and this was where the Härjapea River flowed down the klint in its historical bed. On the other side of the place of the present-day Boiler House, there used to be canals feeding the city of Tallinn with drinking water.

In the early 20th century, buildings of the cellulose factory were constructed in Fahle area to the design of architect Jacques Rosenbaum; 1922 marked the completion of the Boiler House and in 1937 the Chimney was erected.

In 2017, the team of LUMIA, then under the name KAOS Architects, started cooperation with Fausto Capital to recreate the appearance of Fahle estate, which can now, as a result, boast the Headquarters of Postimees newspaper and the renewed historical buildings at Tartu mnt 80 and 82, with net floor area of more than 30,000 m².

The award-winning Fahle Gallery Street was created by LUMIA and studio ARGUS.

LUMIA is also preparing the renovation design for Fahle Boiler House.

Landscape architecture: KINO

Projects of LUMIA in Fahle Park:

Headquarters of Postimees

Tartu mnt 80

Tartu mnt 82

Fahle Gallery

Fahle Boiler House

Tartu mnt 80m

Tartu mnt 84b

LUMIA and PULT win design contest for exhibitions of Tallinn City Museum

In cooperation with the creative agency Pult, we have won the design contest for renewing exhibitions of Tallinn City Museum.

The contest was aimed at finding a design solution to renew the permanent exhibition in the fortifications museum at the Kiek in de Kök tower in Tallinn Old Town and to create an exhibition about the activities of the Brotherhood of Black Heads at Kiek in de Kök and in Tallinn City Life Museum.

Our winning entry chimes with the strong character of the historical space at Kiek in de Kök. For example, the visitor will enter in the midst of a battle scene, as if time was standing still during an attack, the soldiers in armour frozen in combat. The landscape beneath their feet is also descriptive of the situation, being characteristically shaped, muddy and scrambled, which renders the scene even more realistic.

In the floor of the Kiek in de Kök tower, there is an opening not readily explained in the present exhibition. Yet it is a very characteristic and necessary element of a fortification tower: it was used to transport ammunition (cannonballs) to the upper storeys. We are planning to highlight and explain this to the visitors by means of a light installation.

Authors of the design solution: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Celine-Cathy Raaga and Viktoria Ugur (LUMIA); Erika Saks and Maaja Kuiv (Pult)

Renovation works about to begin in Kuressaare Castle

Saaremaa Museum on the western Estonian island of Saaremaa is rich in exhibits as well as buildings. A real gem among them is Kuressaare Episcopal Castle with its outstandingly preserved medieval architecture and interesting collections. The interior of the museum will now undergo renovation works.

LUMIA became the main contractor of the restoration design for Kuressaare Castle as a result of the open design competition. We have completed the restoration design, which will be carried out in phases.

At the end of August, a construction contract was concluded between Saaremaa Museum and Arens Ehitustööd and the renovation works will begin today. The guests will soon be greeted by a substantially more accessible ground floor of the castle with restored rooms and renovated interior. The main three levels of the castle will be interconnected by a new lift. The gateway will get windproof glass floors and a renovated information and ticket-sale area.

The renovated museum plans to reopen in one year.

Client: Saaremaa Museum

Architecture and interior architecture: LUMIA and studio ARGUS

Authors: Margit Aule, Margit Argus, Kristi Merilo and Elo Liina Kaivo

Solis BioDyne’s new green building

Solis BioDyne, a Tartu-based international and swiftly evolving biotech company, has decided to raise a new building that would convey its vision.

The location in the Green Park of Tartu, a rapidly developing production and business area, provides an opportunity for growth and being connected with the city: e.g. following the example of Ülemiste City in Tallinn, a new train stop is being planned so that people arriving in Tartu could go off at the Green Park stop.

The two-storey building accommodates labs as well as offices, lined by an outdoor garden through two floors. The green plant façades, the flowing spatial layout and the spiral staircase all carry a clear message of thinking outside the box.

The team of LUMIA had a superb opportunity to design this environment as a whole: the architecture, the interior architecture and the landscape. Our partner for landscape gardening was Alari Suurmets.

Client: Solis BioDyne (SBD Capital OÜ)

Architecture: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Laura Ojala.

Interior architecture: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Celine-Cathy Raaga.

Structures and engineering design: Projekt O2

From a granary into a cinema and now into a luxurious villa

The historical granary on the property at Suur-Lossi 14 can be seen on a town map of Haapsalu from 1848 and on a lithograph from 1858. The first known conversion project dates back to 1925, when there were plans to turn the former granary into a cinema, called ‘Empire’. Over time, the building was redeveloped on a number of occasions, adding new elements in tune with the times. In 1956 a cinema named ‘Oktoober’ (October) was opened in the building. Later, after privatisation, the building accommodated a nightclub called ‘Club Impulse’.

The granary, the cinema and the nightclub – all the former functions of the building – had no need for windows. Yet the building is situated at a unique location in the Old Town of Haapsalu with views of the evening sun and Väike Viik lake. The new owner, Arjan Van Der Kooij saw the former cinema as a promising private residence, and the architects now had to meet the challenge of how to open the building to sunshine and the views: there is sea on one side and a historical episcopal castle on the other.

We decided to remove the cinema auditorium on the garden side: that side of the building will be glass-only, with terraces opening into the garden. The building has also some interesting stalinist elements, and we have preserved the gable together with the fenestration. The height and slope of the roof have been restored on the basis of the granary building, with some new incised elements aimed at opening the building to the evening sun and the sea.

Architecture and interior architecture: Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Kristi Merilo

Visuals by Yellow Studio – 3D visualizations

LUMIA is creating new interior for Fahle Boiler House with Fausto Capital and Occo

The architects of LUMIA are designing a new life for the last monument to be renovated in Fahle estate: the Boiler House. This building, approximately 6000 m², is a real gem of industrial architecture that could be an ideal home to an ambitious company thinking outside the box.

Fahle Boiler House was initially completed in 1922 but there had been a mill in that place in the 13th century already. Next to the location of the Boiler House on the verge of the North Estonian Klint once ran the River Härjapea, which served as a source of water for the Old Town of Tallinn as well as the Kadriorg area. Traces of water canals are still there under the ground.

The lofty building is single-storeyed and accommodates, in addition to the boiler, a number of technical facilities and passages that give the interior a unique industrial-historical look. We will add new mezzanines, leaving openings in them to allow light and sight to move freely.

Fausto Capital is planning to start the construction this year already. Help with furniture and fittings will be provided by Occo.

Authors of the renovation concept design: Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Karina Krestinov, Laura Ojala

Photos: Martin Siplane

LUMIA’s conceptual design for restricted design contest of Triple Net Capital

We were inspired by the views of Lake Harku and forests of Astangu that would open up from the prospective buildings, and offered a white and light cluster of houses, where the exterior of the entire building would be balconied. The extension of residential space to outdoors will provide an additional quality to the compact apartment. The space between the buildings would be green while cars would be hidden underneath the raised landscape around the building.

Authors of the conceptual design: Toomas Adrikorn Margit Aule, Katri Mets, Karina Krestinov, Kristo Põlluaas

LUMIA’s conceptual design for Uusküla spa competition

The sandy beaches on the northern shore of Lake Peipsi are a scenic holiday destination, for which a new spa hotel is being planned. LUMIA’s entry for the design contest proposed a volumetrically structured building, in which the functions have been arranged with due regard to directions of view and light. The spa and the restaurant would be placed towards the evening sun and lake views, and the rooms area would also be structured so as to create better views. The exterior would be covered with patinated copper, which will work in synergy with the green of the pine needles and the brown of the bark.

Historically, this property has accommodated the buildings of a holiday centre that belonged to Sillamäe Chemical Plant.

Authors of the conceptual design: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Karina Krestinov, Katri Mets

LUMIA signs contract with Fausto Capital to design renovation of Fahle Boiler House

Fahle Park, one of the rapidly developing business areas in Tallinn will receive a new landmark, as Fausto Capital and LUMIA have concluded a contract for designing a renovation of the historical Fahle Boiler House. The building still accommodates a lot of interesting technical facilities, such as boilers, bogies, railway sleepers and underground technical tunnels. The high chimney of the Boiler House will be the main attraction after the completion of a new viewing platform at its top.

The ongoing cooperation between Fausto Capital and LUMIA has resulted in more than 30,000 m² of new office space being completed and now in use in Fahle Park. The revival of the area has also been noted by the public: in February, Fahle Gallery was recognised with the Annual Award of the Estonian Cultural Endowment in the category ‘New from old’.

Architecture: LUMIA (Margit Aule, Toomas Adrikorn, Karina Krestinov, Laura Ojala)

Fahle Gallery Street wins Annual Award of the Estonian Cultural Endowment

LUMIA, together with KINO landscape architects and studio ARGUS, received the Annual Award 2021 of the Cultural Endowment of Estonia (Architecture Endowment) in the category ‘New from old’ for Fahle Gallery Street. According to the jury, the gallery passage is a well-accomplished symbiosis between new and old, architecture and vegetation planning. The new meeting place in Fahle Park has been noted and recognised.

Fahle galeriitänav roheliste taimede ja uue klaaskatusega

Margit Aule and Toomas Adrikorn establish LUMIA

Six years since the beginning of their cooperation in KAOS Architects, Margit Aule and Toomas Adrikorn have established a new architecture firm, LUMIA.

As a result of division by formation of new companies, KAOS Architects, the company founded in 2010 by Margit Aule and Margit Argus, was wound up and LUMIA launched out in 2022 as one of its successors, equipped with the earlier know-how, the contracts, the portfolio and the employees.

LUMIA has extensive experience of creating modern contextual architecture, and its portfolio contains a number of award-winning projects, including the Pilgrims’ House in Vastseliina and the building of Estonian Embassy in Moscow.

The meanings of the name LUMIA are open to interpretation, reflecting a shared vision and common values. The works of LUMIA will be centred on sensitive integration of the existing with the new to form a whole.

The integrative spaces are being created by a team of 12 specialists: Toomas Adrikorn, Margit Aule, Karina Krestinov, Moonika Liias, Kristi Merilo, Katri Mets, Laura Ojala, Kristo Põlluaas, Celine-Cathy Raaga, Laura Susi, Viivika Tiirik, Katrin Vilba.